This is a great piece by Ted Gioia. If you don’t know him, he wrote a great book called ‘The History of Jazz’ (1997) that is a great read. I was given it as a gift when it came out – I’d never heard of him and, to be honest, haven’t heard much since. I recently stumbled across his YouTube channel – he has less than 700 subscribers and this video has less than 5000 views.

I don’t think Ted is doing it for the views. Given the regular discussions that come up about streaming services – physical media or streaming, which streaming service is the best – this may be of interest. It’s only 10 minutes long and it takes a wider view of what streaming might mean for music and, indeed, what it might mean for visual media too.

For the record (pun absolutely intended!), I’m with Ted on this one.

Someone (forget who) recently posted about the inability to have liner notes with streaming services. I’m not a user of streaming servs, but recently got the 70th anniversary vinyl reissue, from original tapes, of Birth of the Cool. Two discs with 16 pages of awesome liner notes. Actually a booklet in gatefold, with amazing reproductions of band pictures. The quality is amazing, and comes with a new essay about the recording. I’d definitely miss this on streaming!

50 years on, and after all of the technological advances since, the moon landing still seems like cutting edge stuff. With all of the scifi films where ships are like large motor homes with all of the comforts from home, and journeys across the galaxy seem to take a few hours it’s easy to forget that it wouldn’t be a far cry to describe this adventure as three guys stuffed in a cupboard, strapped to a controlled bomb, before being thrown at another planet and hoping to hit it. Here’s to the geniuses that made it happen, in space and on the ground.

I love the Eno album, it’s quite zen, and really gives you an impression of how quiet/lonely I imagine it must have felt like. But then… what do I know.

The Public Service Broadcasting album is a 10/10 album. From the opener, which uses Kennedy’s speech, it’s totally engaging. ‘The Other Side’ is fabulous and the section in the middle when Apollo 8 has gone behind the moon, and is out of touch with Mission Control, is done so well you have to remind yourself to breathe. I’m sure most people will know the album. Give it another listen today. If you haven’t heard it, get a copy… NOW!… there is no more auspicious day to give it a first listen than today.

TO INFINITY AND BEYOND! What do you mean that wasn’t Neil Armstrong…

This is a summary of what has recently come to light regarding a Universal Music Group fire in 2008 when a LOT of music master tapes were lost. This is the music equivalent of the fire at the library at Alexandria.

A longer discussion about this was was posted by Rick Beato (about a week later) talking about what this might mean for music fans, foe Universal, and also for artists. A fair point made is that Universal seem to be more active ‘protecting’ their music by issuing ‘take downs’ against people on YouTube than in actually protecting the original music tapes.

If you’ve ever watched Rick Beato’s ‘What Makes This Song Great’ videos you’ll see the advantage in being able to access original tapes where you can isolate particular instruments or vocal performances. Consequently, I think there is going to be a big impact on scholarly activity, particularly in relation to 20th century black music in America as well as the golden age of rock and pop.

You can watch the longer discussion here…

Bands from my younger days that you typically don’t hear a lot about these days 
 and then suddenly 
.

Nektar

Reformed Nektar launch Kickstarter for new studio album. – without Roy? It won’t be a ‘Tab In The Ocean’ 😊

Mark-Almond

Remember that UMG fire in 2008 – turn out MarkAlmond’s back catalogue was destroyed in it. – I know – so did a lot of other artists (including another favorite Colosseum), but Mark-Almond were special to me, so I’m taking it personally.

The Enid

A new album – with Robert John Godfrey at the helm 
 surprising – given that he was diagnosed with Alzheimers three years ago and handed over the control of the band to others 
 still – need to visit this when available and give it a listen.

This is exactly what it looks like
 weird. A one man production, literally recorded in his garden shed in Hull over a 6 year period (’79-’85) and released as a cassette advertised in the back of computer magazines. Those were the days, eh?

It’s a home written and recorded War of the Worlds type affair where all of the characters, including the aliens, have various Hull-type accents. What starts off being quite twee actually grabs your attention and becomes really enjoyable and all the more amazing for the fact that there was clearly no big budget or production team, and this is waaaaay before Garageband. It was all done on a Tascam 8-track,

It ultimately came to the attention of Trunk Records years later
 indeed, in the next century!, and it was given a remaster and a limited release on vinyl (500 copies). I managed to snag one and it has pride of place in my record collection. Although sold out, you can download an mp3 version from Trunk Records website for ÂŁ4.99. It runs to nearly 90 minutes in total so that’s not a bad deal.

If you want some more info I’d suggested checking out Trunk Records at https://trunkrecords.greedbag.com/buy/galactic-nightmare-0/ and there’s some additional information at http://trunkrecords.com/turntable/galactic_nightmare.shtml

If you search on Galactic Nightmare on YouTube, it’s actually been uploaded in 4 parts if you want to check it out.

No idea what happened to the author though.

Was never really in to the band, but remember the song from my time at Uni. Great version.

Only found out a few years ago that they were a Scottish band, from Bellshill. Bellshil is not a glamorous location and yet has produced The Soup Dragons, Teenage Fanclub, some of the members of Mogwai and, sadly, Sheena Easton. To be fair, Sheena was the first from this list to come out of Bellshill so it’s been improvement ever since. I’ll spare Sheena any more criticism and not talk about The Big Day festival in Glasgow, in 1990, when… oops.

Anyway, congratulations to The Cousins, as our chums across the pond are referred to in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, on their big day. Have a groove with the Soup Dragons.